Inquiry On An Experiment And Questions

It would be very interesting to see the effects of the Ark crystal in the proximity of pure honey as it crystallizes. Have there been experiments on things that crystallize in the proximity of Ark crystals?

Do Ark crystals have bands/ regions with greater and lesser density like electron orbitals?

Have there been experiments on insect colonies and alike? Would the Ark crystals effect the structure of a beehive, or an ant colony, or something of the sort made up of many individual living subjects?

Would there be specific regions where colonies would prefer a particular distance?

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In french, not about the ARK technologie, but very interesting.

Interesting questions.

Do Ark crystals have bands/ regions with greater and lesser density like electron orbitals?

Somewhere Nassim or William Brown mentions that each ARK crystal emits photons passively, about 300 per second.

I imagine they would be emitted from the vertices of the truncated tetrahedron. That’s where I’d look first. Then I’d look to the centers of the large faces opposite the vertices - there is a mirroring thing going on, I think.

ARK crystals should emit a standing wave in a characteristic pattern of photons and maybe piezo-electric charge.

Have there been experiments on insect colonies and alike? Would the Ark crystals effect the structure of a beehive, or an ant colony, or something of the sort made up of many individual living subjects?

Would there be specific regions where colonies would prefer a particular distance?

It seems you are asking, in general, how will and ARK affect the emergent behavior of chaotic systems, will the ARK enhance the emergence of order in those systems? Other examples would be murmuring swallows, the swimming of some fish species, swarming creatures, herd behavior, not to mention weather, the spread of ideas on the internet…

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I’ve come across what you said in the top half you mentioned within my studies already. Exciting stuff. I just bought my Ark crystal pendant the other day and believe it comes today. I heard mention of discounts for contributing members and delegates I asked a couple people but just decided to buy it full price because it helps. I’m going to be wearing it but perhaps I’ll do some experiments involving distance from the crystal. I guess chaotic systems is a good way to describe it but sounds kind of like a detached way of looking at it as a model separate from the field. There are little organic dudes with minds, just like us, collectively forming a colony and I’m just curious to see if there’s a distance preference similar to distance planets take from the sun, for example.

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Just want to be sure you are familiar with chaos theory.

Chaos theory is a branch of mathematics focusing on the study of chaosdynamical systems whose apparently random states of disorder and irregularities are actually governed by underlying patterns and deterministic laws that are highly sensitive to initial conditions.[1][2] Chaos theory is an interdisciplinary theory stating that, within the apparent randomness of chaotic complex systems, there are underlying patterns, interconnectedness, constant feedback loops, repetition, self-similarity, fractals, and self-organization.[3] The butterfly effect, an underlying principle of chaos, describes how a small change in one state of a deterministic nonlinear system can result in large differences in a later state (meaning that there is sensitive dependence on initial conditions).[4] A metaphor for this behavior is that a butterfly flapping its wings in Texas can cause a hurricane in China.[5]

Small differences in initial conditions, such as those due to errors in measurements or due to rounding errors in numerical computation, can yield widely diverging outcomes for such dynamical systems, rendering long-term prediction of their behavior impossible in general.[6] This can happen even though these systems are deterministic, meaning that their future behavior follows a unique evolution[7] and is fully determined by their initial conditions, with no random elements involved.[8] In other words, the deterministic nature of these systems does not make them predictable.[9][10] This behavior is known as deterministic chaos , or simply chaos . The theory was summarized by Edward Lorenz as:[11]

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Wow. Thank you so much for your patience with me. It’s quite phenomenal that I found the exact jargon and references I needed within a part of the phenomenal meta-mind, William(s), elective course. I’m going to have to review your comment here and become more familiarized with agents and swarm behavior.
Per Aspera Ad Astra.

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It’s just so fascinating how intuition can seem to interact with future events. Here I am asking a question directly pertaining to what I was going to learn in the next day; today, by reference of yesterday’s question.

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