Point particle and vacuum

It is very hard for me to wrap my head around and electron being a point particle. Meaning we know it exists but it has no volume. Can anyone help me with this?

Does light have volume?

Also, so what I am gathering from a vacuum is that there is no such thing as a true vacuum? Which leads to there is no such thing as nothing?

I saw a video of a huge NASA tank that was able to suck out all the air. A feather and a bowling ball were dropped and they did “fall” at the same time. So basically all the air was pumped out so there was know friction to slow down the feather.
But that tank was still filled with a field that was made up of smaller particles than air particles as to not slow down the feather?

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I asked a similar question about light particles yesterday. I hope we find answers.
As for the resistance of the Plank Field, I think I can answer that. But it’s just my conceptual understanding.
Consciousness creates the illusion of a world of objects. The objects, the ball and the feather are energy vortexes in the Plank Field.
The phenomenon that appears to us is waves of energy. Here is an analogy. We are like a TV set receiving the waves of energy. The waves of energy progress similar to a wave of sound moving through a piece of steel. There is only a wave progression.
The plank field is the media that the energy vortexes exist in, and it is so dense that it offers no resistance.
I might be opening my self to some criticism, but I believe the Plank Field itself may only be a concept because I’m beginning to feel as if there is no space at all. Every thing feels like it has the weight and size of a thought. I no longer feel like time and space exist. We only think the bowling ball and feather dropped.

I think that’s a good philosophical point you make. It’s like an extension of Schrodinger’s cat. Without conscious life there would be no known universe. We could even surmise that without conscious life there would be no existential universe at all. But because there is conscious life (well, sort of) then all sorts of things appear to exist, at least conceptually. Which leads to the fact that we only ever get to experience ourselves, or as the mystics have always agreed, the whole universe only exists within consciousness. Whatever the case it makes our existence almost unbelievable in that the awareness of the universe around us indicates the existence of another dimension where that awareness springs from.

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Mr. Campbell and Mr Grinstead (I like that your last name has a smile reference)

Thank you so much for your replies it validates my seeking. I understand what you both are saying about maybe all there is - is consciousness. I hope that’s not the case. I hope for a universe that exists within my consciousnesses and outside of my own consciousnesses. Maybe I’m not understanding you both correctly? Are you saying that the physical doesn’t exist, only the awareness of the physical?
Mr. Grinstead I can see about what you are saying that we only get to experience ourselves. However, I believe that both you John and Bob have influenced my experience. You both have expanded my field of knowledge. To me that is the beauty of consciousness/awareness. My awareness is enriched because I am aware of the both of you.
It’s like through meditation I seek within to find truths only to help me become a better person/feather/bowling to those around me.

All good things
Ruben

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Hi Ruben, it seems that myself and Mr Campbell both took somewhat of a philosophical diversion from your original post. Of course, because we do exist consciously, then there is a world that we can examine and the questions you raise would probably be better answered by someone more scientifically minded than myself. What I enjoy about the Unified Physics expounded by Nassim is that ultimately it does lead to the question of what is consciousness, recognizing as it does that without consciousness we would not be able to make any observations or calculations of the known universe at all. Therefore it is an essential part of scientific inquiry to examine consciousness especially as there is now plenty of scientific evidence that even our observation of apparently external phenomena, has the strange power to change those same phenomena. The question about “Nothing” is also a philosophical question, because as there is indeed Something, then we can say that the potential for Something must always have existed. And if the potential for Something always existed then there never was, and never could be total Nothingness. I enjoy philosophy but I don’t look for existential answers there. Instead I enjoy the experience of feeling completely connected to whatever the universe is made of, and also that whatever urges gave rise to the Universe, I must be part of those also.